everyone loves you when you’re dead-neil strauss

“my gut feeling tells me that i’m going to suffer.”

well, duh, homie. unlearning ain’t a cake walk. but thank you for the reflection(s) that i’m ready to do the work that i’m doing. this book has been the perfect companion through this wave of inspiration and commitment to my writing, and i am moved in ways that i hope to translate more than i want to describe. bigups, neil strauss. i see the work that you’ve done and the care that you’ve taken. the ny times book review co-signed on the “outrageous things” advertised on the cover-tucking christina aguilera into bed and buying pampers with snoop dogg, but i’m truly impressed by the fact that he asked kenny g about doing drugs, hipping me to a fake bootsy collins, including snippets of his interview with jordy, and penning the only luda innerview that i’ve ever read that wasn’t boring as hell. if anyone has that neneh cherry profile in details that he speaks about, please get at me.

here’s a teaser:

What do you mean by that?

FLEA: People talk about love being painful and terrible and all that. I think it’s only painful and terrible if you’re scared of your own self. For me, that’s when it was painful. The times of my life when I’ve been scared to love somebody are because I’m scared it’s going to hurt when I get left alone or if they don’t love me back the way I want them to. I’ve been through some terrible lows because of that, but it’s only because I’m scared. (P. 471)

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4 thoughts on “everyone loves you when you’re dead-neil strauss

  1. “Madonna has an unusual way of relating to strangers. She will ask questions-lots of questions. She will pay attention closely and ask good follow-up questions, yet you will get the uncomfortable feeling that she isn’t so much listening as she is allowing you to speak. And so long as you are interesting or able to offer something she wants to learn, she will keep allowing you to talk. But as soon as she’s gotten what she wants or her status as queen is threatened, she will turn ice cold.” (P. 022)

    So what was the first club you went to?
    MADONNA: I was kind of a geek when I moved to New York, and I loved to read. You never know when you’re going to get stuck in a room or on the subway with nothing to do-and I hate wasting time. So I always used to bring books everywhere in case it was going to be a drag or things got boring.
    So the first club I ever went to was this club called Pete’s Place. It was kind of like a restaurant-bar-disco. And all the lounge lizards were hanging out there. And everybody was so fucking cool. The guys all had forties suits on and porkpie hats. And the women were so glamorous: They all had red lipstick and black eyeliner and high heels. And I felt so dull. Because I was kind of embarrassed, I just sat in my corner and read my book. (P. 023)

    werd. this and dating tupac redeem her for one blink:
    http://www.poundmag.com/blogs/got-your-back-7-01/

  2. peer pressure:

    (TWIGGY) RAMIREZ (of MARILYN MANSON): Because it made me look at death just a whole different way. After you pull the pieces of someone’s bones out of the dirt, it makes you realize how totally useless everyone is. I had them lying around a hotel room for a while, and there were all sorts of pieces. There was a skull cap and ribs and finger bones. And I used to wear the bones in my hair. It was a very bizarre part of my life. We were in the hotel room and someone had a pot pipe and I don’t smoke pot. So I put a piece of the human bone inside the pipe and began to pass it around, and I told them what it was. They didn’t believe me, but they all began to smoke this bowl of human bones. The room smelled like burnt hair. And they just kept on doing it, with this bad taste and all the bones going up in smoke. (P. 159)

    “The two had met for the first time the previous night, during which time Manson had talked Corgan into snorting Sea-Monkey eggs and tried to stuff the end of a glow-in-the-dark bracelet down Twiggy’s penis hole.” (P. 169)

    DAVE NAVARRO: Someone asked me today, “If Courtney Love, Marilyn Manson, and Billy Corgan were drowning in water, who would you save first?”

    Who asked you that?
    NAVARRO: I don’t remember. Who would you choose?

    You can’t choose Courtney, because she’d pull you down too and you’d both drown.
    NAVARRO: And Manson would make me want to drown.

    Or he’d talk you into drowning just to entertain himself.
    NAVARRO: And Billy would just watch, and talk about how he could have saved us better than everyone else. (P. 173)

    BON JOVI: It’s very strange, because when people react to you like they do, you think, “Oh, right, I’m supposed to be special.” And then you go, “Calm down, you’re not,” and you get over it. Personally, I don’t pay attention to that nonsense. There’s probably five kids in the audience at any given concert that are going to be on that stage themselves some day. And every night you just have to be better than you were the night before if you want to keep doing what you’re doing. (P. 197)

    What would be an example of professionally?
    BRAND: On September the twelfth, 2001, obviously the day after the attack on New York, I went to work to interview Kylie Minogue and I went in there with my drug dealer, Gritty. He looked like a drug dealer-complete with gold teeth-and he asked me to show his kid around. I went, “Yeah, of course. No problem.”
    /Take your drug dealer to work day/ was the way I later framed it. So I went to work that day with Gritty and his son, Edwin, and we were both sort of high. I was all dressed in a combat jacket, with white pants kind of like pajama bottoms and a long white top that went down to my knees. I had a fake beard on, and a towel on my head held on with a bit of string. And I was walking around MTV that day and everybody was like, “What the fuck are you doing?” I was like, “Come on, it was yesterday. Get over it.”
    So I interviewed Kylie Minogue dressed in that outfit, and I introduced Kylie to my drug dealer. (P. 329)

    “When meeting Stephen Colbert, I expected that he’d either be in the character of the ironically egomaniacal star of his late-night political comedy show, /The Colbert Report/, or be the witty, sarcastic, politically opinionated intellectual that he probably is in real life. But the Stephen Colbert I met was neither of those characters.
    He was Ned Flanders.” (P. 386)

  3. motivations:

    “In my ten years at the newspaper, I turned in many stories to that editor. Sometimes I’d write obituaries for people just months after interviewing them. Other times I’d write their obituaries while they were still alive: If Bob Dylan was sick of Courtney Love was on a drug binge, the editor would request one in advance-just in case.
    Unlike him, though, I found writing obituaries stressful, because I wanted to make sure that I did justice to these people’s lives, knowing that their family might read the article in search of some consolation, some sign that their loved one’s time on this planet had truly mattered to others.” (P. 454)

    How would you feel if Kimberley started dating twin brothers?
    HEFNER: We’ll cross that bridge when we get there. But, actually, I think the fact that I am seeing three ladies rather than one probably doesn’t make it easier for her. If I were seeing only one person continually, then it would be a much closer comparison to the marriage and that would be, by its nature, more difficult.
    (P. 221)

    Joni Mitchell’s thoughts on..

    …charity.
    After /Billboard/ honored me, all of a sudden VH1, who wouldn’t play my videos, decided to honor me, which means they get a free concert out of me. Then they hand me a check for my favorite charity, they take it away, and they get the tax write-off. So I refused to do it. (P. 284)

    “I have to put an end to it,” he explained. “If people are going to hate me, I want them to hate me for the right reasons.” (Marilyn Manson, P. 183)

    LIAM GALLAGHER: Everyone goes around saying, “God, God, God, God.” What the fuck did he leave us? The Beatles left us loads of songs that I could believe in and helped me understand why I felt sad, and helped me get up off my bum and do something about it. (P. 131-2)

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