hope: a tragedy by shalom auslander

“Life: examine at your own risk.” (239)

“that’s probably why my raps are so simple now”

“Fake’s going to cost you these days, Mr. Kugel. Reality’s on the block for cheap.” (20)

so three months after i heard yeezus for the first and only time, i picked it up on a the quiet day after my birthday party and before i left for my fall trip to montreal, and haven’t put it down since. then i saw this clip of him from the ice-t documentary that reminded me of the clip of him from that poorly strung together QDIII doc years ago, and you know-they guy is consistent. i’ve said this before, and i will maintain it until i actually meet the man-but i don’t really give a shit what he does, musically-he’s a genius. and the real magic about him is that he is a true artist-to the core-look how much he feels every little thing and pours his fucking heart into every verse he drops. it’s easy to dismiss him if you’re not willing to acknowledge what he really means and represents, and in a world when it’s easy to push things under the rug, i make the conscious effort to engage with kanye, because it means that i will be inspired by his example (however messy) to engage and untangle myself.

my branch is closed for a month, so i’m using the time to go put pause my holds list and read the books that stay with me for various reasons. this one was leant to me by a customer, and i felt bad after seeing her once after a long while that i hadn’t even cracked it. the timing was perfect, as it was a particularly trying week, and it provided me the stress release via laughs that i needed, and it was the jumpoff for many great conversations at work.

“While there’s never a good time to find Anne Frank in your attic, this was a particularly bad time.” (41)

“Fucking glutens, he grunted through clenched teeth. Fucking Anne fucking Frank.” (109)

and that pretty much encapsulates so much of working at an organic grocery store and stumbling through the relationship part of a relationship. but it also speaks to healthy decisions, calling guilt out as a bullshit reason to compromise on defining your own boundaries, and whose creative process gets to take precedence. the book is also about drowning in obligations, defining your own legacy, and shakes up the whole notion that we are entitled to such a self-indulgent practice as humans.

“If you don’t learn from the past, said someone, you are condemned to repeat it. But what if the only thing we learn from the past is that we are condemned to repeat it regardless? The scar, it seems, is often worse than the wound.” (271)

“I think never forgetting the Holocaust is not the same thing as never shutting up about it.” (323)

i returned this book to its lovely owner with a bookmark of a winter scene as designed by a three-year-old (for the library) and a handbill promoting the (now upcoming) yeezus tour.

“They say you can’t take it with you, but good luck trying to leave it behind.” (24)

i have a serious crush on j.cole’s profile picture and want a boston cream donut. thank you and you’re welcome.

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One thought on “hope: a tragedy by shalom auslander

  1. “why did children always draw the sun smiling? he wondered. It’s a giant ball of /fire/, kids. It’s rage and fury. Whatever it’s doing, it isn’t fucking smiling.” (158)

    “Vans are the vehicle of murderers. Serial killers, rapists, thieves. Nothing good ever happens in a van. Police should be allowed to arrest van drivers without cause. The van is the cause, asshole.” (163)

    “Why, why-life is a little why, is it not? A little why here, a little why there. More whys than becauses, precious few becauses, and a mountain of therefores that don’t quite add up.” (265)

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