downtown owl by chuck klosterman

“She was vivacious and loquacious, which made her flirtatious. Words ending in
-ious are bad for marriages.” (184)

“It is important to have questionable friends you can trust unconditionally.” (161)

“In baseball and sex, cliches are usually true: Pitching beats hitting, and people always want to be loved by anyone who doesn’t seem to care.” (60)

“Julia’s fake love for Vance was exhilarating and idiotic; it was the kind of love you can only feel toward someone you don’t actually know.” (77)

and so the ratio of fulfillment from an imaginary relationship is decided solely on the strength of the person who dreams it up and is magnified by her loneliness. i remember exactly where i was when i read this book-in an indian restaurant on bloor and lansdowne with one of my adopted mommies in this city. i had just met (and almost sabatoged) the love of my life and was still feelings feelings over it. this book provided a much-needed laugh out loud via the dealing with a breakup by pissing on a stereo system and i’m surprised that passage did not make it into my records. i appreciate klosterman‘s exploration on fear as shitty motivator and have some regrets over the level of indignation that i have expressed in the past year over his fiction-it probably wasn’t appropriate. my bad.

“Society is so confused, Mitch thought. Everyone wanted to become the person they were already pretending to be.” (108)

“It’s hard for Americans to differentiate between talent and notoriety; TV confuses people.” (126)

“As far as Horace could decipher, destiny was a concept that forced you to live a certain kind of life on purpose, even though you were already living that life by accident. And that seemed immoral,not to mention stupid. Why would existence be designed as a redundant system? Destiny made God seem like an unconfident engineer.” (67)

if ever a case was made for why you should live your (own) life here on earth, this would be it.

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